Moviemaking Course: Principles, Practice, and Techniques: The Ultimate Guide for the Aspiring Filmmaker Reviews

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  1. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Jam packed info!, May 20, 2006
    By 
    OMAR (NJ, USA) –

    This review is from: Moviemaking Course: Principles, Practice, and Techniques: The Ultimate Guide for the Aspiring Filmmaker (Paperback)

    This book is excellent because it is filled with loads of information and it is very concise too. What makes it such a good read is that it has so much information, yet quick-paced and very organized. Nothing is left out, cameras, shots, framing, scriptwriting, makeup, casting, etc. Intuitively divided: pre-production, shooting and post-production.

    It explains the movie making process from A-Z without bogging you down with every single detail. For each section respectively, the author gives you a good overview and then important details and examples of what you need to know. It’s a great way to cover so much in a 140 pg. book. Although it’s an easy read, you will learn a lot.

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  2. Unzar Jones says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Short Concise Overview In Brief: An Addendum to A Movie Making Course, March 24, 2010
    By 
    Unzar Jones (Southern California) –

    This review is from: Moviemaking Course: Principles, Practice, and Techniques: The Ultimate Guide for the Aspiring Filmmaker (Paperback)

    The word “concise” is used to describe this book and that is a fair statement. Each topic is dealt with mostly in two or three pages, much of which is photos or illustrations. Being as short as it is, don’t expect a lot in the way of depth. It’s use is limited to those who are brand new to film making concepts or who need a quick lookup. For example, you will learn what the Division of Thirds is, that you should use optical zoom instead of digital zoom, and that sound is very important. Take away the eye candy and there is not much meat on the bone.

    The best use of this book is as a visual reference for basics. There are photos demonstrating aspect ratios, a graphic showing color temperatures, 1-4 light setups. Don’t know what a ten minute documentary is? Look it up. Hint: It’s a very short documentary. Also, a 15 second film is roughly 15 seconds.

    To sum up, this is all info that you can find in minutes on the internet unless you don’t want to look or don’t know what you’re looking for. Some of the material seems dated as usually happens when that new piece of equipment they show as an example is now found in the tech museum.

    A companion book with a nice layout- while having some use and looking pretty- just doesn’t live up to it’s title.

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