The Angry Filmmaker Survival Guide Part One: Making The Extreme No Budget Film

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  1. A. Frazier says:
    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Dilettantes and poseurs need not apply, July 30, 2009
    By 
    A. Frazier
    (REAL NAME)
      

    If you want to be a filmmaker — that is, if you actually want to spend your life making films, and not just entertaining pretty little Tarantino daydreams of glory — you need to listen to Kelley Baker.

    Oh, sure, I know, Robert Rodriquez says he can tell you everything you need to know in ten minutes — but dude, Robert Rodriquez is now best known for “Spy Kids” and “Shark Boy and Lava Girl in 3-D”. Is that really the model you want to live up to?

    Or yes, I know, Kevin Smith parlayed some white lies and credit card debt into an inexplicable career based largely on Ben Affleck and the good graces of the Weinsteins. Bless his heart, it works for him — though it’s never worked for anyone else, ever, in the history of motion pictures.

    But if you’re in this game because you love movies and because you have stories that need to be told — that is, if you really want to get down and make some films — then Kelley is the only guy who’s going to give it to you straight. It’s not always pretty, and it’s definitely not easy. But you don’t need flattering lies and empty encouragement, you need someone to tell you a) how to get it done, and b) how not to screw it up. Kelley’s book has you covered in a way that no other title does.

    Look at all the other “How to be a guerilla filmmaker!” books on the shelves, and then try to find the films those authors have produced. Hear the crickets chirping in the background? Yeah. Kelley knows what he’s talking about because this is what he does, day in and day out. He’s figured out what works and what doesn’t through hard work, dogged determination, and sheer force of will. And because he’s the kind of person who wants to see more good films made, and more good filmmakers making them, he’s giving you the benefit of his hard-won wisdom and knowledge without all the pain.

    Trust Kelley. He knows what he’s talking about, and he won’t steer you wrong. No smoke blowing, no sugar-coating, no white-washing, just the real, angry truth. And the beautiful thing is, if you’re really ready to start making films, Kelley is one of the most encouraging, hopeful teachers you could hope to have. He’s the one who can tell you what you need to know to stop messing around and start making your films and telling your story.

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  2. Colleen Strohm "Colleen Strohm" says:
    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Brilliant!, August 1, 2009
    By 
    Colleen Strohm “Colleen Strohm” (Portland, OR USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Brilliant! Like Kelley. It is my gift of choice for all those college graduates who are off to make their mark.

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  3. Christine Carter says:
    2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The only book you’ll need to understand how you want to make films, August 20, 2009
    By 
    Christine Carter (Portland, OR) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Kelley Baker isn’t a theoretician working in the collegial environment publishing his ideas. He’s a filmmaker who’s succeeded in making films without the Hollywood machine behind him.

    What I love most about Survivor’s Guide is that Baker gives a very direct, high density manual on the how to’s of making and distributing your film yourself. He’s not forgiving of those who want to do it independently until they can hit it big with a studio picture, and in doing this, Baker is redefining what it means to be truly independent. I’ll bet if I asked him, he’d tell me that he doesn’t want to land a big studio feature.

    I was also moved a great deal by Baker’s subject matter. His new model of filmmaking is about local stories, with local actors. It’s true storytelling because it becomes incredibly meaningful to the communities who are impacted in and by the stories themselves.

    I think this book has implications for the country’s big picture economy. It’s possible that it works for every industry not only filmmaking. So thank you for doing this work in the world Mr. Baker. And thank you for giving America’s workers a blueprint for a new model of sustainable livlihood – a way to thrive doing what you love.

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